HelpfulThought

The 12 Healthiest Breakfast Foods

Posted by Lucy L. on February 29th, 2020 • 5 mins read

Cantaloupe

Just about any fruit is a good addition to breakfast, including cantaloupe. About one-quarter of a melon contains just 50 calories. Plus it provides 100% of your recommended daily intake of vitamin C as well as vitamin A, an important nutrient for smooth, younger-looking skin. Cantaloupes, like most melons, have a high water count, which means eating one will help you stay hydrated and even battle cravings.


Watermelon

Watermelon is not only refreshingly tasty, as its name suggests, this fruit is a great way to hydrate in the morning. Plus, it has only 40 calories in a cup, which is why it's been found on lists of so-called negative-calorie foods. Few people realize that this juicy fruit is also one of the best sources of lycopene—a nutrient found in red fruits and vegetables that's important for vision, heart health, and cancer prevention. Research conducted at the University of Kentucky found that eating watermelon may improve lipid profiles and lower fat accumulation too.


Greek Yogurt

Yogurt is packed with filling protein that helps to battle mid-morning cravings. It's also a good source of bone-building calcium. But it's important to avoid the processed type and buy plain yogurt instead. You can add your own natural sweetener, such as fresh fruit or a teaspoon of raw honey.


Bananas

Bananas are a great eat-on-the-go option. They're rich in fiber, vitamin C and potassium, which many Americans don't get enough of in their diet. A medium banana contains 422 milligrams of potassium and no sodium which helps control blood pressure. Plus, there's nothing like a banana at breakfast to keep those mid-morning cravings at bay. It's one of the best sources of resistant starch, a healthy carbohydrate that will help keep you feeling fuller longer.

Oatmeal

Oatmeal is as close to perfect as you can get for a breakfast food. It's quick and easy to make and it has 4 grams of fiber per cup. Research suggests that increasing your intake of soluble fiber (a type of fiber found in oatmeal) by 5 to 10 grams each day could result in a 5 percent drop in LDL ("bad") cholesterol. 


Since it's loaded with dietary fiber, it can also help keep you feeling fuller longer. No matter what type of oatmeal you choose, avoid the processed, flavored types which are often loaded with sugar as well as additives and preservatives. For added flavor, top oatmeal with sliced bananas or berries.



Lucy Locke

I love writing awesome articles.